No Funeral Processions

no funeral processions at Star of DavidIt is common to conduct a procession of vehicles from the funeral home to the place of worship (if the funeral is not given at the funeral home) and then from there to the cemetery. The deceased is usually transported in a hearse at the front of the procession, with family and friends following behind in their own cars. These processions are a traditional way to travel with the deceased for one last time.

Funeral processions also bring about an acknowledgement that there was a death in the community, as people see the procession driving by. And finally, being in the procession is a part of the mourning process and may give the mourners a sense of unity as they travel as one.

Star of David Funeral Home is conveniently located near a number of Jewish cemeteries. This eliminates the need for a procession between Star of David and the cemetery plot. This can alleviate some of the stress put on families in making them travel great distances to the gravesite, and in having to separate and then meet up with the group again at the burial site. The short distance is also a great convenience for families who can easily travel from the funeral home to the gravesite without dealing with additional stresses such as traffic.

Star of David is conveniently located near some of Long Island’s Jewish cemeteries:

  • Beth Moses Cemetery is the closest, located only .8 miles away in Farmingdale. It was established in 1949 and has approximately 50,000 graves.
  • Wellwood Cemetery, is located only 1 mile away. It opened as an addition to the Beth David Cemetery in Elmont.
  • New Montefiore, is also located only 1 mile away in West Babylon. Established in 1928, New Montefiore is now one of the largest Jewish cemeteries in New York. As such, they also follow Jewish traditions in closing on the first day of all Jewish holidays as well as closing the office on legal holidays.
  • Mount Ararat is located 1.4 miles away in Lindenhurst. Established in 1928 as an alternative to a conventional Jewish cemetery, Mount Ararat only has private family plots as opposed to burial societies.